(Paper) The Review of Mock CAT Sample paper 3

The Review of Mock CAT Sample paper 3

 

1. In an examination, the average marks obtained bystudents who passed was x%, while the average of thosewho failed was y%. The average marks of all students takingthe exam was z%. Find in terms of x, y and z, the percentageof students taking the exam who failed.

A. x-z/y-z

B. y-x/z-y

C. y-z/x-z

D. z-x/y-x

 

2. Three girls Joan, Rita, and Kim and two boys Tim and Steve are the only dancers in a dance program, which consists of six numbers in this order: One a duet; two a duet; three asolo; four a duet; five a solo; and six a duet. None of the dancers is in two consecutive numbers or in more than two numbers. The first number in which Tim appears is the one that comes before the first number in which Kim appears. The second number in which Tim appears is one that comes after the second number in which Kim appears. Which among the following is a complete and accurate list of those numbers that could be the last one in which Kim performs?

A. four

B. four, five

C. five

D. three

 

3. Train A traveling at 60 km/hr leaves Mumbai for Delhi at 6 P.M. Train B traveling at 90 km/hr also leaves Mumbai for Delhi at 9 P.M. Train C leaves Delhi for Mumbai at 9 P.M. If all three trains meet at the same time between Mumbai and Delhi, what is the speed of Train C if the distance between Delhi and Mumbai is 1260 kms?

A. 135

B. 60

C. 120

D. 90

 

4. A 5 cubic centimeter cube is painted on all its side. If it is sliced into 1 cubic centimer cubes, how many 1 cubic centimeter cubes will have exactly one of their sides painted?

A. 98

B. 9

C. 54

D. 61

 

5. The sentences given in each question, when properly sequenced, form a coherent paragraph. Each sentence is labeled with a letter. Choose the most logical order of sentences from among the given choices to construct a coherent paragraph. ) A. Surrendered, or captured, combatants cannot be incarcerated in razor wire cages; this ‘war’ has a dubious legality B. How can then one characterize a conflict to be waged against a phenomenon as war? C. The phrase ‘war against terror’, which has passed into the common lexicon, is a  huge misnomer D. Besides, war has a juridical meaning in international law, which has confided the laws of war, imbuing them with a humanitarian content. E. Terror is a phenomenon, not an entity – either State or non-State.

A. becda

B. ebcad

C. cebda

D. ecdba

 

6. Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow it Modern science, exclusive of geometry, is a comparatively recent creation and can be said to have originated with Galileo and Newton. Galileo was the first scientist to recognize clearly that the only way to further our understanding of the physical world was to resort to experiment. However obvious Galileo's contention may appear in the light of our present knowledge, it remains a fact that the Greeks, in spite of their proficiency in geometry, never seem to have realized the importance of experiment. To a certain extent this may be attributed to the crudeness of their instruments of measurement. Still, an excuse of this sort can scarcely be put forward when the elementary nature of Galileo's experiments and observations is recalled, Watching a lamp oscillate in the cathedral of Pisa, dropping bodies from the leaning tower of Pisa, rolling balls down inclined planes, noticing the magnifying effect of water in a spherical glass vase, such was the nature of Galileo's experiments and observations. As can be seen, they might just as well have been performed by the Greeks. At any rate, it was thanks to such experiments that Galileo discovered the fundamental law of dynamics, according to which the acceleration imparted to a body is proportional to the force acting upon it. The next advance was due to Newton, the greatest scientist of all time if account be taken of his joint contributions to mathematics and physics. As a physicist, he was of course an ardent adherent of the empirical method, but his greatest title to fame lies in another direction. Prior to Newton, mathematics, chiefly in the form of geometry, had been studied as a fine art without any view to its physical applications other than in very trivial cases. But with Newton all the resources of mathematics were turned to advantage in the solution of physical problems. Thenceforth mathematics appeared as an instrument of discovery, the most powerful one known to man, multiplying the power of thought just as in the mechanical domain the lever multiplied our physical action. It is this application of mathematics to the solution of physical problems, this combination of two separate fields of investigation, which constitutes the essential characteris tic of the Newtonian method. Thus problems of physics were metamorphosed into problems of mathematics. But in Newton's day the mathematical instrument was still in a very backward state of development. In this field again Newton showed the mark of genius by inventing the integral calculus. As a result of this remarkable discovery, problems, which would have baffled Archimedes, were solved with ease. We know that in Newton's hands this new departure in scientific method led to the discovery of the law of gravitation. But here again the real significance of Newton's achievement lay not so much in the exact quantitative formulation of the law of attraction, as in his having established the presence of law and order at least in 11. Fill in the blanks  with th appropritae words Early _____ of maladjustment to college culture is _____ by the tendency to develop friendship networks outside college which mask signals of maladjustment.

A. identification, complicated

B. prevention, helped

C. detection, facilitated

D. treatment, compounded

 

12. The circumference of the front wheel of a cart is 30 ft long and that of the back wheel is 36 ft long. What is the distance travelled by the cart, when the front wheel has done five more revolutions than the rear wheel?

A. 900 ft

B. 25 ft

C. 750 ft

D. 20 ft

 

13. Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow it Modern science, exclusive of geometry, is a comparatively recent creation and can be said to have originated with Galileo and Newton. Galileo was the first scientist to recognize clearly that the only way to further our understanding of the physical world was to resort to experiment. However obvious Galileo's contention may appear in the light of our present knowledge, it remains a fact that the Greeks, in spite of their proficiency in geometry, never seem to have realized the importance of experiment. To a certain extent this may be attributed to the crudeness of their instruments of measurement. Still, an excuse of this sort can scarcely be put forward when the elementary nature of Galileo's experiments and observations is recalled, Watching a lamp oscillate in the cathedral of Pisa, dropping bodies from the leaning tower of Pisa, rolling balls down inclined planes, noticing the magnifying effect of water in a spherical glass vase, such was the nature of Galileo's experiments and observations. As can be seen, they might just as well have been performed by the Greeks. At any rate, it was thanks to such experiments that Galileo discovered the fundamental law of dynamics, according to which the acceleration imparted to a body is proportional to the force acting upon it. The next advance was due to Newton, the greatest scientist of all time if account be taken of his joint contributions to mathematics and physics. As a physicist, he was of course an ardent adherent of the empirical method, but his greatest title to fame lies in another direction. Prior to Newton, mathematics, chiefly in the form of geometry, had been studied as a fine art without any view to its physical applications other than in very trivial cases. But with Newton all the resources of mathematics were turned to advantage in the solution of physical problems. Thenceforth mathematics appeared as an instrument of discovery, the most powerful one known to man, multiplying the power of thought just as in the mechanical domain the lever multiplied our physical action. It is this application of mathematics to the solution of physical problems, this combination of two separate fields of investigation, which constitutes the essential characteris tic of the Newtonian method. Thus problems of physics were metamorphosed into problems of mathematics. But in Newton's day the mathematical instrument was still in a very backward state of development. In this field again Newton showed the mark of genius by inventing the integral calculus. As a result of this remarkable discovery, problems, which would have baffled Archimedes, were solved with ease. We know that in Newton's hands this new departure in scientific method led to the discovery of the law of gravitation. But here again the real significance of Newton's achievement lay not so much in the exact quantitative formulation of the law of attraction, as in his having established the presence of law and order at least in

 

16. What is the area of  the largest triangle that can be fitted into a rectangle of length 'l' units and width 'w' units?

A. lw/3

B. (lw)/2

C. (3lw)/4

D. (2lw)/3

 

17. Three girls Joan, Rita, and Kim and two boys Tim and Steve are the only dancers in a dance program, which consists of six numbers in this order: One a duet; two a duet; three asolo; four a duet; five a solo; and six a duet. None of the dancers is in two consecutive numbers or in more than two numbers. The first number in which Tim appears is the one that comes before the first number in which Kim appears. The second number in which Tim appears is one that comes after the second number in which Kim appears. Rita must perform only in duets if

A. Kim is in number two

B. Tim is in number two

C. Tim is in number one

D. Kim is in number five

 

18. Fill in the blanks with the appropriate words A growing number of these expert professionals ________ having to train foreigners as the students end up _____ the teachers who have to then unhappily contend with no jobs at all ornew jobs with drastically reduced pay packets.

A. welcome, assisting

B. resent, replacing

C. are, supplanting

D. resist, challenging

 

19. Read the passage given below and answer the questions that follow it Modern science, exclusive of geometry, is a comparatively recent creation and can besaid to have originated with Galileo and Newton. Galileo was the first scientist to recognize clearly that the only way to further our understanding of the physical world was to resort to experiment. However obvious Galileo's contention may appear in the light of our present knowledge, it remains a fact that the Greeks, in spite of their proficiency in geometry, never seem to have realizedthe importance of experiment. To a certain extent this may be attributed to the crudeness of their instruments of measurement. Still, an excuse of this sort can scarcely be put forward when the elementary nature of Galileo's experiments and observations is recalled, Watching a lamp oscillate in the cathedral of Pisa, dropping bodies from the leaning tower of Pisa, rolling balls down inclined planes, noticing the magnifying effect of water in a spherical glass vase, such was the nature of Galileo's experiments and observations. As can be seen, they might just as well have been performed by the Greeks. At any rate, it was thanks to such experiments that Galileo discovered the fundamental law of dynamics, according to which the acceleration imparted to a body is proportional to the force acting upon it. The next advance was due to Newton, the greatest scientist of all time if account be  taken of his joint contributions to mathematics and physics. As a physicist, he was of course an ardent adherent of the empirical method, but his greatest title to fame lies in another direction. Prior to Newton, mathematics, chiefly in the form of geometry, had been studied as a fine art without any view to its physical applications other than in very trivial cases. But with Newton all the resources of mathematics were turned to advantage in the solution of physical problems. Thenceforth mathematics appeared as an instrument of discovery, the most powerful one known to man, multiplying the power of thought just as in the mechanical domain the lever multiplied our physical action. It is this application of mathematics to the solution of physical problems, this combination of two separate fields of investigation, which constitutes the essential characteristic of the Newtonian method. Thus problems of physics were metamorphosed into problems of mathematics. But in Newton's day the mathematical instrument was still in a very backward state of development. In this field again Newton showed the mark of genius by inventing the integral calculus. As a result of this remarkable discovery, problems, which would have baffled Archimedes, were solved with ease. We know that in Newton's hands this new departure in scientific method led to the discovery of the law of gravitation. But here again the real significance of Newton's achievement lay not so much in the exact quantitative formulation of the law of attraction, as in his having established the presence of law and order at least in